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Watershed Management : Flooding and Floodplain Management   



Coastal Resiliance Planning Tools for Building Sustainable Communities

Presentation given at the Southeast Watershed Forum's conference, Building Sustainable Communities for the 21st Century, held August 12-14, 2008 in Charleston, SC. 

Coastal Resiliance Planning Tools for Building Sustainable Communities - Lauren Long, NOAA Coastal Services Center



Dept. of Soil Science at NCSU Photo Database on Flickr
Contributors to the SoilScience.info initiative are making available hundreds of photos related to soil management, crop production, soil formation and mapping, animal waste management and other related topics. There are a variety of ways to browse the gallery: view the slideshow, browse the collections, select photos from a list of keywords, or tour the map.

From Greenscapes to Hardscapes: A study of tree canopy and impervious surface in the Metro Atlanta area
Upper Chattahoochee Riverkeeper partnered with the University of Georgia in a study to create the firstever data set of tree cover and impervious surface in the 16-county Atlanta metro area. The study mapped change over a ten year period, using satellite images taken in 1992 and 2001.

Inital Recommendations of Miami Dade County Climate Change Advisory Task Force

Presentation for the Southeast Watershed Forumís conference, Building Sustainable Communities for the 21st Century, held August 12-14, 2008, in Charleston, SC.

Inital Recommendations of Miami Dade County Climate Change Advisory Task Force - Captain Dan Kipnis



NOAA Coastal Risk Atlas

The NOAA Coastal Risk Atlas (CRA) project goals aim at aiding hurricane preparedness efforts by providing the data and methodology necessary to conduct vulnerability assessments for the coastal United States. Provided data include:

  • Acquired hazard model outputs such as storm surge, maximum winds, and inland flooding to help locate vulnerable areas
  • U.S. Census demographic data to help locate vulnerable populations
  • Critical facilitites such as police and fire stations, emergency centers, and hospitals
  • Base layers such as evacuation routes and other roadways, streams, water bodies, and land use data showing economic sectors within the community
  • Boundary areas such as evacuation zones and populated places

Resources available through the CRA:

  • Vulnerability Assessment Mapping
  • National Observations and Vulnerability Mapping
  • Downloadable ArcGIS Extensions
  • Downloadable Data
  • Links to GIS and Emergency Management Resources
     


NRCS Wetlands Reserve Program

The Wetlands Reserve Program is a voluntary program offering landowners the opportunity to protect, restore, and enhance wetlands on their property.  The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides technical and financial support to help landowners with their wetland restoration efforts.  The NRCS goal is to achieve the greatest wetland functions and values, along with optimum wildlife habitat, on every acre enrolled in the program.  This program offers landowners an opportunity to establish long-term conservation and wildlife practices and protection.

 



RELATIONSHIP OF FOREST DESTRUCTION AND SOIL DISTURBANCE TO INCREASED FLOODING IN THE SUBURBAN NORTH CAROLINA PIEDMONT
A research study was conducted to determine the significance of soil disturbance, urban vegetation and infiltration in suburban stormwater management. A considerable amount of suburban land is commonly denuded and soil sufficiently disturbed to produce a marked increase in downstream flooding. Sensitive land use planning can significantly reduce the amount of tree destruction and soil disturbance during urban development. Reclamation of disturbed sites through urban soil and tree management has the potential to significantly increase the low infiltration conditions thereby reducing the volume of stormwater runoff.

Sustainable Development in Coastal Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina - Lessons Learned

Presentation given at the Southeast Watershed Forum's conference, Building Sustainable Communities for the 21st Century, held August 12-14, 2008 in Charleston, SC. 

Sustainable Development in Coastal Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina - Lessons Learned
Melissa Pringle , Eco-Systems, Inc.

Part 1 / Part 2



The Growing Case of Community Liability - Larry Larson Southeast and Tennessee

Watershed Roundtable Presentation, 2004

This presentation will focus on watershed based approaches to development that all communities face. It will include a discussion of the No Adverse Impact (NAI) approach to development that integrates various programs at the local level. Communities undertake activities every year that change their future, and either increase their flood risk or prevent future increases. Integration of appropriate measures in community activities like hazard identification, education and outreach, planning, regulation, mitigation, public infrastructure and emergency services is the key. Some of the legal issues will also be discussed, such as community liability and property rights, which are key community concerns.

Download PDF (4.9 MB)



Urbanization and Streams EPA Case Studies
The following case studies demonstrate the impacts that increased flow due to urbanization can have on urban streams. Like urban streams, each case study is unique. The case studies look at different attributes such as habitat, stream stability, and sedimentation. In some cases, where field data did not quantify the impacts, models were applied to estimate impacts. When available, cost information related to the impacts and restoration is included. Southeast case studies include:
Holmes Run Watershed - Fairfax County/Falls Church, Virginia
Peachtree Creek - Atlanta, Georgia
Atlanta Metropolitan Area - Dekalb County, Georgia
Various Streams - North Carolina Piedmont

Urbanization and Streams: Studies of Hydrologic Impacts
Hydrologic impacts due to urbanization are reported to cause water quality problems such as sedimentation, increased temperatures, habitat changes, and the loss of fish populations. Although there is widespread recognition that these problems are caused by increased runoff volumes and velocities from urbanization and associated increases in watershed imperviousness, much of the reported information has been anecdotal. The summaries and analyses of reports and case studies in this report are intended to go beyond the anecdotal and provide documentation of problems and sources, as well as a foundation for further investigation.


 
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